Tuesday, April 1, 2014

Modi is one among three, says Advani


One of Osho Rajneesh’s witty tales is about a man who runs into his old friend after a gap of some twenty years.  The man (let’s call him Ram) took his friend (let’s call  him Shyam) home and gave him the best clothes he had.  Then both the friends decided to take a stroll in the village.

Interesting body languages
Everyone on the way enquired about Shyam.  Ram realised that all the people took note of Shyam’s clothes.  In fact, Shyam looked charming in those clothes.  Beautiful women eyed him wistfully, or so thought Ram. 

They visited the houses of some important personalities in the village.  “This is my friend, Shyam, whom I’ve met after some twenty years,” Ram introduced his friend.  Then he said, “he’s a very successful and charming person.  But the clothes he’s wearing, they’re mine.”

Shyam flinched slightly but ignored it.

A similar introduction was given in the next house too.  When they came out of the house, Shyam said, “You know, if you wish we can exchange our clothes.  I’d be happy wearing those clothes you’re wearing.”

“No, not at all,” said Ram.  “You look fine in them.  Keep them.”  But the manner of introduction did not change.  So Shyam explained to his friend that he was feeling awkward with that introduction.  Couldn’t he avoid the mention of the clothes?

“Oh, sure,” said Ram.  “I won’t mention them.” 

In the next house, Ram said, “This is my friend, Shyam, whom I’ve met after some twenty years.  He’s a very successful and charming person.  About the clothes he’s wearing, well, I’ve promised him not to mention them.”

I was reminded of this story when I read Mr L K Advani’s comments about Mr Narendra Modi – reported in today’s newspapers.  “Our Modiji isn’t the only one who has scored a hat trick in elections,” said Advaniji.  “Shivraj Singh Chouhan and Raman Singh have also been elected thrice like him.”  Advaniji did not forget to mention also that in 1990 Modiji escorted him during the Rathyatra he led demanding a Ram temple at the site of the Babri Masjid. 

How destiny reverses roles!


The moral: Even destiny cannot suppress jealousy. 

Title courtesy: The Hindu


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20 comments:

  1. Enjoyed reading. The message you shared in the end is what we should keep in our minds.

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    1. Isn't it interesting to note that even approaching the grave doesn't cure one of certain basic human vices?

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    2. Yes, it is. We are humans, we won't change.

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  2. Hello sir, visiting your blog after quite sometime. Interesting connection between a short story and modern politics. Btw, that witty tale is also a famous comedy scene in Padayappa - a Tamil movie starring Rajinikant

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    1. That's interesting, Adarsh. If I'm not mistaken I read this tale in Rajneesh's book, 'From Sex to Superconsciousness' written in early 1980s.

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    2. I am sure the story came much earlier. Here is a link of the video, in case you understand a bit of Tamil http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L9uVbTOfiWM

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    3. Thanks, Adarsh. Of course, I understand "a bit of Tamil".

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  3. What a fate for Advaniji!
    Well noticed and brought out. :)

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    1. You can imagine the frustration of the man, Indrani. For decades, Mr Advani nurtured the dream of becoming the PM. And now this!

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  4. Nice to read you.Interesting story.

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  5. Agreed that his demands should have reduced with time but still a Leader takes everybody together..A dictator forces people to fall in line...
    You are smart enough to spot the difference

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    1. I certainly wouldn't want a dictator to rule my country, Kapil. I don't fall in line easily, either. Anyway, it's my choice that matters in the end.

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  6. Well said.... and yes even the looming gravestones can't deter the 'feelings'

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    1. And in Mr Advani's case it must be more painful to let go the "feelings" since his lifetime's ambition is being stolen by his own acolyte.

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  7. Wow....sharp observation...the message in the end...awesome

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  8. I would put the moral in a slightly different way. It was destiny that seems to have actually squeezed out (or even given rise to) the jealousy. If Advani's destiny was to become PM, the jealousy perhaps would not have existed. Destiny's tricks!!

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