Thursday, September 18, 2014

A Brief History of China


In one of his Odes, the Roman poet Horace portrays Maecenas, Roman statesman, as wondering what the Chinese were up to.  Horace lived in the first century BCE.  He was exaggerating when he wrote that; he was trying to please his patron by depicting him as someone whose concerns extended far and wide.  But, with hindsight today, we can say that Horace’s line was not sheer hollow flattery.

Some 200 years before Horace, Shih Huang-ti, who was called – or called himself –  ‘the First Emperor of China,’ employed 700,000 labourers to build the humungous Great Wall of China by linking the many existing fortifications.  He also constructed a huge network of roads and canals paving the material foundations of a great civilisation.

Shih Huang-ti was a barbarian conqueror, however.  He was illiterate and was despised by his literate subjects.  His dynasty failed eventually.  His renown became equivocal.  But the Great Wall caused him to be revered as the founder of China.

Many dynasties came and went in China.  But the country remained steadfast in its basic culture and civilisation.  It flourished in spite of its torrid summers and icy winters.  In spite of the intractable mountains and the ‘sorrow-inundating’ Yellow River. 

It flourished and expanded to become the largest population in the world, a population whose size surpasses the populations of the entire Europe and North America combined.  It flourished by both spreading its culture and conquering people. 

In the words of historian Felipe Fernandez-Armesto, “Most of the people who have adopted Chinese culture were not originally Chinese but have come to think of themselves as such.  In the course of centuries of borrowing and imitating Chinese ways, Fukienese, Miao, Nosu, Hakka and many others have disappeared into the majority.  It was not a cost-free process: it involved cultural immolation.  Today’s minorities – Muslim, Macanese, Tibetan and the cosmopolitan sophisticates of Hong Kong – feel threatened by this powerfully homogenizing history.” [Civilizations; emphases added]

No force in history succeeded in overpowering the Chinese civilisation.  For example, the White Lotus movement proclaimed a fanatical kind of Buddhism in the 14th century only to abandon the objective once the leaders won power.  The Taiping revolutionaries of the 19th century borrowed their key notions from Christianity, but their influence disappeared with their subsequent defeat.

In the 20th century, Mao Tse-tung’s revolution claimed to be based on Marxism.  Mao even called for the books of Confucius to be burnt.  But 30 years after that revolution, Marxism was abandoned and Confucius continues to shape Chinese civilisation and its values.

Even the foreign invaders who vanquished the Chinese armies ended up succumbing to the superiority of the civilisation of the vanquished.  The barbarian neighbours of the Sung dynasty, the Mongol conquerors of the 13th century and the Manchu in the 17th century are examples. 

Chinas continues to lead.  In the 20th century, it re-annexed Tibet, invaded Korea, re-acquired Hong Kong and Macao and has a number of active border disputes with neighbours including India. China has imposed a kind of economic imperialism in Myanmar, Philippines, Indonesia and Malaysia.  

With new ties being forged between the supposedly old friends (Hindi-Chini, bhai-bhai), what kind of cultural footprints will China leave in India?

Today the visiting Chinese President has promised India an investment of Rs120,000 crore over the next five years.  Will India become an economic colony of China is a matter that is best left to the future to show since we now live in ‘a global village’ with ‘open borders,’ however selective the openness in reality is.

Two of my earlier posts on China:



18 comments:

  1. Thank you Tomichand for such an interesting insight into Chinese history. I was not aware of it and find it very interesting. The last thought of how would China play its cards with India is also thought provoking and perspective driven.

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    1. China is all poised to be the next global superpower. We cannot afford to ignore it. :)

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  2. If China decides to march into any of its neighbour's territory, it is as good as that country is conquered. Don't know how good an idea it is to let them manage our railways.

    -Balasubramaniam Meganathan

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    1. China is a dangerous ally as it has proved in many countries where it invested capital. India may have some clever plans of handling Chinese cleverness. There're some parallels between our present PM's and the Chinese ways.

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  3. Nice write up with lot of info that I would never google, because it never occurred to me to read about china this is the first time people are really getting interested in the various delegations that Modi is meeting, we are introspecting everything maybe because it is Modi who is meeting.

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    1. China has poked India off and on right from our Independence. But the current visit of the Chinese President may mark some change in the Indo-China relationships. Or will it?

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  4. On one hand Chinese continue to trespass, on the other hand they are ready to invest in various sectors. It doesn't look like a friendly hand shake. However you are right only time can tell what would be the outcome.

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    1. Chinese intentions cannot be very genuine in any case, I think. But when it comes to trade who looks at intentions except profit?

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  5. on the eve of Chinese president's visit to India , u gave a fantastic but brief history of China. This country always looks like a secret for most of Indians. great post

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    1. Glad you like it. China does have a lot of secrets. We should not forget the bamboo curtains and iron curtains of the old days. Even now there's much censorship in that country.

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  6. Excellent write-up Tomichand. This article gives a valuable outlook towards china and its impact towards southeastern nations. You can also add chinese silent project's around India i.e. develpment of naval ports in Humbantotta, Srilanka and pakistan. China is surrounding our nation in all means and its time for us to beware of them.

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    1. In one of the links I've given at the end, I wrote about the security threat that China poses for India.

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  7. There is a reason that The Chinese civilization survived...they eradicated all foreign influences and made them their part.

    There is a reason that The Indian Civilization never perished in totality i.e. it survived It took in every foreign influence and lived with them

    Feminism is the spirit of Indian civilization whereas the Chinese Civilization is Masculine in spirit. Our decadence lies in the fact that we pretend to hold to our masculine spirit but that never worked for us.

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    1. That's a very interesting way to look at it, Datta. Now that you've pointed it out I have come to notice it too. Yes, look at the religions that originated in India: they are effeminate, particularly Buddhism and Jainism. Our culture has that very marked feminine touch. Maybe, our new PM will change that.

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