Wednesday, April 22, 2015

India, Religion and Noise

Japan's latest maglev train
 When Japan was test-running the fastest maglev train in the world, India was discussing whether Taj Mahal was originally Tejo Mahalaya, a Hindu temple.  In spite of all the great slogans like ‘Make in India’ that the Prime Minister bestowed on the nation, nothing has changed for the better since the BJP came to power.  Many things changed for the worse, in fact.  There is more communal polarisation, for example.  There is increasing disgruntlement among the economically weaker sections.  And history is being twisted out of shape.

History as social science is being replaced by history as fantasy and myth, says the editorial in today’s Hindu.  Why is India still so much obsessed with religion and its infantile myths and rituals, when countries like Japan are making rapid progresses in science and technology in spite of the conservatism that runs deep in the people’s veins?

The BJP wanted to come to power and used religion as an easy tool.  Fine.  One can understand the game given the history of the country’s politics.  Having achieved the goal, why does the party still cling on to the tool?  It’s like the hunter searching for the shot bullet instead of the fallen game. 

Why can’t India grow up?  Is it because the right wing is suffering from an acute identity crisis?  No one feels the need to assert a particular identity raucously unless one feels insecure or inferior on account of that identity.  Even the strident assertions of the superiority of one’s religion and culture usually have their roots in some painful feeling of inferiority.

12 comments:

  1. That's true. The last line is very powerful. It must be some sense of inferiority that makes people assert their superiority on others. Or else why a person would leave the path of peace and development if not due to the insecurities penetrating deep within. India should move on. The time has come when the youth shall act. BJP is hopeless. Any political party is hopeless. They are still clinging to their rotten fundamentals.

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    Replies
    1. So much aggressiveness is also a sign of inferiority complex, Namrata.

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  2. Indian politicians simply want power to rob the people easily, and they use different tools howsoever temporary and destructive.And don't under estimate common people,they also seek their own share in it.

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    Replies
    1. True. Without the common man's support the game can't go on. Perhaps some people also suffer from serious identity crisis.

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  3. The last time anyone tried to assert their identity on a nation, they ended up losing the Second World War.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. And there are a lot more parallels between the two situations....

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    2. I'm actually waiting for you to publish an entire comparative study between these 'situations' as they are.

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  4. Nice blog as well as posts. I have become a fan of you. Please visit and give your valuable suggestions for my blog as well.
    www.differentcolorsofindia.blogspot.in

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you.
      My knowledge of Hindi is not good enough to understand your blog. I'll keep trying :)

      Delete
  5. When there will be equality things will change, I heard an amazing speech by a farmer now a MP and a weaker class by caste too and was in agreement to his suggestions and woes. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fD1-arWXGFU

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    Replies
    1. Equality is an impossible dream given the socio-economic system we are following.

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  6. What's your view on C missionaries spending millions in converting poor tribals instead of spending on development?

    ReplyDelete

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