Saturday, October 18, 2014

Not all terrorists are inhuman


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Kidnapped by the Taliban is a recently published book written by Dr Dilip Joseph, along with a co-author, about his experiences with the Taliban in Afghanistan.  Dr Joseph is an American physician of Indian origin.  His dream was to offer his medical services for the welfare of humanity.  In 2009 he joined the Colorado-based non-profit community and economic development organisation, Morning Star Development.

On 5 Dec 2012, Dr Joseph and two colleagues, en route from a medical clinic in an Afghan village to Kabul, found themselves face-to-face with four men carrying AK-47s. Forced at gunpoint into the back of a truck and driven to a remote location, the men were sure their hours were counted.

The doctors were rescued on the fifth day by the American Navy SEAL Team Six, the elite group of soldiers that took down al-Qaeda founder Osama bin Laden.  The book narrates the experiences with the Taliban terrorists.  Dr Joseph learnt how much America values its citizens.  The country sent their best fighters to rescue their citizens from the terrorists.  The doc also writes that not all the terrorists were inhuman.  He was struck by the kindness displayed by some of them.  He realised that the Taliban was also looking for a better, more peaceful, world. 

Well, I haven’t read the book yet.  Just read some reports.  Waiting to read it.



13 comments:

  1. There are many reasons why quite a few humane persons join terrorist organisations. Some are brainwashed into believing that the terrorist organisation has noble objectives, others join as a reaction to their family member or themselves suffering at the hands of the police/military, etc.. Unfortunately, even after they realise that the terrorist organisation is not what they thought it to be, they cannot leave.
    "Taliban was also looking for a better, more peaceful, world." I have very strong doubts about this.

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    1. You have a remarkably good understanding of terrorism, I should say. I also share your doubts about that "peaceful world" the book seems to imply. I understand it differently, though. I understand that the Islamic terrorists think, like our Hindutva counterparts, that homogeneity is the key to peace. It's ridiculous to say the least. But who becomes terrorists but those who are rendered ridiculous by the prevailing system? Well, I'm sure you understand.

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  2. That's touching.
    Nice to know that. Yes, we all want peace.
    How inhuman not to desire peace. Hope the Taliban understands that guns don't win...

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    1. But peace cannot come through the barrel of the gun except in extremist ideology and ideology is a mere dream, Anita.

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  3. This sounds interesting Matheikal. After these continuous reports about the Taliban in a negative manner, a book which takes the alternate route sure rises my curiosity.

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  4. I would be interested to read about the first hand experience of some neutral person about Taliban. I must tell you no one can be 100% evil just like no one can be 100% good. That is what a human is not God and not Satan either :)
    Its just the inclination toward the either that decides our proximity to enlightenment..

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    1. i'm going to read this book, Roohi, but not for discovering neutrality. Why does a doc born in India (Kerala, in fact) find it easier to understand a terrorist in Afghanistan when he cannot serve the poor people in his own state and went to America to serve which sent him to Afghanistan...

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