Tuesday, May 10, 2016

Politics of Allegations


The most sacred duty of our political leaders seems to have become hurling allegations against one another.  Turn to any news channel on the TV at any time and you will hear some politician accusing another one of some crime.  The Prime Minister accuses the Leader of the Opposition of chicanery.  The Chief Minister of Delhi accuses the Prime Minister of possessing fraudulent academic degrees.  In Kerala which is going to the polls next week, every candidate’s speeches are spiced with aspersions cast on the integrity of his opponents.  In addition to all the domestic laundry washing carried out in the public places, the Keralite is condemned to endure much laundry brought from Delhi by all the significant leaders including the Prime Minister.

Moulding Kerala in the Modi way
A Dalit student was raped and killed brutally (or killed and then raped, as reports have it) recently in Kerala.  The police carried out the mandatory investigation in the most perfunctory manner because the woman was a penniless student belonging to a low caste, without any political clout or social support of any sort.  Unexpectedly, however, the case shot to limelight when the Prime Minister himself took a personal interest in it.  The Prime Minister took the politics of allegations to a new height (or depth, if you prefer) by politicising the murder of a woman who was a symbol of the helplessness of the poor people in the country. 

As a helpless observer, I am left wondering why our leaders do nothing more than accusing one another of some crime of commission or omission?  Why not do something for the people instead?

The plain truth is that nobody would have bothered about that Dalit student who was killed brutally had it not been the election time in Kerala.  The painful truth is that the killed student is being killed again and again by the politicians by being converted into a political football that is kicked around in the playground of allegation-game. 

We need leaders who have some creative vision.  Leaders who can envisage what is good for the people and who can implement that vision in practical ways.  The tragedy of India is that it has no such leader today.  Instead it has powerful orators who can entertain us with jibes and rhetoric.


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12 comments:

  1. Seriously during campaigning and elections , the hate speeches shows the real face of our leader. Hitting below the belt has become a regular feature which was repeatedly shown during Delhi , Bihar election

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    1. Election after election reveals the sinister faces beneath the polished masks. We are left longing for something that our leaders seem incapable of giving us.

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  2. I sometimes wonder, can there be any political party which sticks to the standard mmorality and ethics and yet compete with the mighty and monstrous, already established but crooked, political parties? Is throwing mud at others the only norm by which that party (although with good intentions and visonary motives) comes into limelight.

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    Replies
    1. If intentions are good and motives visionary, mudslinging will not happen.

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  3. As you know in Tamil Nadu too, the same condition prevails. Can't we find another Abdul Kalam? Stiĺl such people are never power hungry. So it is impossible to see a visionary holding the power. Only an alternative way of governing people should be designed.

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    1. Is there a better alternative than democracy? I don't know. Earlier there used to be at least some leaders who could inspire people, who looked after people's interests and who had some sort of ideologies. Today we have crooks and criminals sitting in those seats looking after their own interests. This situation should change and people should change it. Stop supporting goons and thugs. Why is democracy becoming demonocracy?

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  4. The allegation game has become all the more dirty now..or rather I should say baseless. I think that's the most easiest way to escape the answers of people.

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    1. Passing the buck. That's what the allegation game is about primarily. Then throw slush on perceived enemies. The PM is leading the game.

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  5. ha ha ha...it seems you don't like Modiji at all. So whatever he does, you have a hate angle to everything. Somalia comment or DNA of Bihar from Modiji are not acceptable...I agree. But there are so many good things about him as well. For me I don't like Kejriwal at all but i always applauded some decisions taken by him. Though I hate Gandhi family like anything but Rahul Gandhi isn't as bad as his forefathers or his mom. He is surely not a PM material but he is damn good as a politician as compared to those who are neck dip with corruptions, allegations and crimes. all i want to say is...coin has two sides, may be don't like one side, but there exist another side which is quite opposite. it applies to human also. when we hate all sides of a person...the problem lies with us...not with the person.

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    1. Thanks for the counsel, Tina. I'm not sure if my hatred or love are as strong as you seem to perceive. I feel with my brain, so to say. I don't forget history. Modi ji's achievements are not as great as people make them out to be. In the absence of good leaders, he towers above others. As a saying goes in my mother tongue, the man with a broken nose is the king in a country of noseless people.

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  6. Telling the Indian people nose less...is an insult Sir...more deadlier than Modi's Somalia comment..isn't it. by the way I don't think Modi's achievement (if any) has made a majority of registered voters to vote for him. it was his intent to deliver. My simple logic is ....Modi has committed haters but not committed voters unlike his peers in other political party. If he doesn't deliver, i bet he isn't going to get a second term. I think as a fast learner and clever politician...Modi understands this.all the fuss in parliament is because of this because Modi wants a second term for which he needs to deliver...isn't it something a good scenario for Indian people?

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    1. I think you should become a politician (if you are not one already).

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