Tuesday, May 24, 2016

To blog or not to blog?


“Writing is a dog’s life, but the only life worth living,” said Flaubert. A meticulous writer whose novels became classics though he was, Flaubert died penniless.  Many great writers lived rather miserable lives because writing was not a very remunerative job in those days.  There were many artists too who lived in utter poverty though after their death their paintings were sold for sums which they could never have imagined in life. 

Is it because they never worked for money that their works had such profundity?  Does money contaminate everything it touches?

There is no money in blogging anyway.  At least, not anything significant.  Flaubert and Dostoevsky could accept the agony of pennilessness because they were in search of something much more meaningful than money.  It is their search for meaning that made their writing profound.  And that search, the search for meaning, is an endless search.

Why don’t we find such deep writing today?  The best writers of our times take shelter in the intrigues of history and/or the chiaroscuro of language.  V. S. Naipaul had even gone to the extent of proclaiming the death of the novel.  Contemporary society cannot inspire profound works.  The human species has become too shallow intellectually and emotionally.  Spiritually too, of course.  Godmen have taken the place of gods.  Mammon has taken the place of gods.  Money cannot stir the depths within.  But who wants depths anyway?

As a blogger I too would be happy to make some money out of the hobby if possible.  But there’s nothing in it.  And yet I continue to blog.  As Joan Didion said, “I write entirely to find out what I’m thinking, what I’m looking at, what I see and what it means. What I want and what I fear...”  I know that blogging for me is more than just an addiction.  That’s why I cannot but blog. 



18 comments:

  1. Our generation, which includes me, search for instant gratification. Who bothers, nowadays, to read a well writen literary piece when all they need is just the plot with sex, violence and glamour.

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    1. It seems some hardships are necessary for escaping the frivolousness of "sex, violence and glamour." Or, hardships are an inevitable part of probing the depths.

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  2. That's the way I go too. Being in the grip of addiction, I have nothing to do but blogging

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    1. Some addictions like blogging are better than many others.

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  3. Blogging is a valve to vent many a pent up ire. I'm happy to belong to this world, though more of a rarely active member. I get to read a lot about things I don't much understand, so it's a continuing education. No complaints from me. :)

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    1. I'm not complaining, Rakesh ji :) Just wondering aloud why serious literature is becoming a rarity. By the way, your stories carry a lot of depth. I'm serious about that, ok?

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    2. Coming from you, it makes my efforts worthwhile, sir! :)

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  4. When you are away and not writing for some time for whatever reasons, you notice the void and realize that the very exercise of blogging means a lot...

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  5. Well said, exactly echoes my thoughts, except that I wouldn't have benn able to put it so well!

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  6. Yours is a soul-stirring story. You are doing what Henry David Thoreau rightly said 'Live Deliberately ! And by doing that you are leaving a rich legacy. Somebody in the succeeding generations definitely may dig out your talents and I am sure that your treasure would comes out and the world would derive benefit. Happy blogging :))))))

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    1. Thanks, VSR. I'm living deliberately, yes. Creating meaning as I go along. There's no other way for people like me.

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  7. Writing has become a part of my life. It doesn't matter anymore how little it pays. It gives meaning to my life and that's enough for me.

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    1. Writing has been a part of me for a long time. I'm not doing it for money either. But I am just wondering... There are all sorts of divine papas and ammas who preach simplicity and austerity to their devotees when they are living in grand opulence. Fraudsters get paid unimaginably while genuine services go unpaid. Funny world it is :)

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  8. Everybody is looking for their two minutes under the sun these days! How I wish Dostoevsky's tribe increases.

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    1. Since Murphy's Law is what works, the movement is always downward...

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