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Why I admire Mr Modi


Hairstyle

Style is the man.  I like Mr Modi’s cascading mane which is being groomed with much care.  I was always a fan of his beard especially since it helped me to justify my own bristles for which I am yet to find an admirer.  Now, having fallen in love with the PM’s mane, I’m thinking of letting my hair down especially behind my neck.  It may help me to keep quiet where I should speak up and blah-blah where I should shut up.

Leadership

Mr Modi doesn’t need any script.  He can speak to the audience any time anywhere without a script written by some political advisor.  Speak effectively too.  He is a born orator.  He knows the power of words and rhetoric.  He can sway his audience with those powers.  That’s the sign of a real leader.  Mr Modi is THE leader.  We deserve him. 

Discovery of India

I am about to complete a year of living in Kerala.  I’m yet to find any ragpicker in the state – whom I used to encounter every day in Delhi in dozens of places.  In fact, I have had to depend on people who can’t even understand a word of Malayalam for most of the works related to the house I’m building in a small village in Kerala.  Kerala pays high wages to the migrant labourers for doing hard jobs while it entertains itself with some political scams and scandals.  Kerala is God’s own country where the gods are dying of laughter.  But Mr Modi found one boy trying to gather food from some garbage heap in Kerala.  That’s the real genius of Mr Modi.  He knows what to find.  Even Einstein would have been a failure before Mr Modi’s genius.   He is rediscovering India. 

I salute this great leader.  India deserves no less a genius.


Comments

  1. Hey is it KERALA or SOMALIA ? :) ... Hope you landed at right place

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    Replies
    1. Modi ji's magic won't work in Kerala, it seems. So the Somalification is meeting with a lot of protests in Kerala. That one remark of Modi is likely to cause much damage to the party's prospects in the state. He did the same in Bihar too: insulted the state and we know what happened.

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  2. Quite Satirical.
    Frankly speaking I have been his fan since I saw his speech for the first time. Whatever the so called BJP leaders or Shivsena followers did and said I blindly supported him. But his Somalia statement hurt my feelings too, as a Malayali.

    But there is something that we conveniently forgot. The conditions in Attappady and the endosulfan hit areas of northern Kerala. If we consider that as a separate entity called Kerala we can justify him. But he generalized the condition of the whole of the state. That's really sad. As you said he nullified whatever chances BJP had in opening an account. Malayalam media that was already biased towards the left-right formula is all set to magnify this grave mistake.

    ReplyDelete
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    1. The man has charisma but no authenticity. That's his problem. He is a bundle of paradoxes, an amalgamation of contradictions. Modernity and obsoleteness mingle in him hilariously. Religion clashes with his ruthlessness. Culture with his internationalism. ...

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  3. I too wondered what made him compare the beautiful literate state to Somalia. Politics.... beyond me.

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    Replies
    1. No great leader will ever focus so much on the negative aspects. How can the PM of a country compare a part of his own country to Somalia? What does it reveal about himself, forget the state concerned?

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  4. we catch only those words which Media speaks loudly .

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    1. The simple truth is that a PM should maintain dignity in whatever he speaks. Modi behaves more like a party campaigner than the prime minister.

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  5. And the good orator didn't think while he spoke in Kerala. Most of his value lost when he insulted Bihar.

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    1. Bihar shows he didn't learn the lesson. Kerala is more politically aware than Bihar. Moreover Kerala has still some intellectuals left who will question all communal politics.

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  6. I admire him for his skill to know when /what to speak and when not to react at all , India will be a different country after his 5 yr rule

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    1. Very correct understanding. See the way he evaded the Somalia controversy by keeping quiet about it when anyone else would have responded one way or another.

      Yes, he will alter India's sensibility in a terrible manner.

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  7. Well-stated, tongue in cheek! Yes, I am disgruntled with his strange attitude of staying mum on major controversies and speaking up just to peddle the party in pre-election speeches!

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    1. Campaigner, that's what he is essentially. Suffers from a lot of inferiority complex. Power is his way of covering up that complex.

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  8. I am looking for my memories through the stories, the narrative of people. I feel it is difficult but I will try.
    instagram online viewer

    ReplyDelete

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