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Advani and Modi

Cartoon from Deepika
This morning's Malayalam newspaper, Deepika, delighted readers with the above cartoon on the front page. Modi is portrayed as Bhima in quest of the Sougandhika flower.  He encounters Hanuman on the way and is unable to meet the challenge posed by Hanuman.  Finally Bhima will understand the real power of his interceptor and seek his blessings.

Fabulous cartoon, I mused.  It depicts the present situation tersely.  And there's a deep irony too in it.

Neither Modi nor Advani is worthy of any comparison with the epic characters.  Both have acted from selfish motives thus far and continue to do so.

But the nature of the Kurukshetra has changed too today.  Today our heroes are no better than these characters.

  

Comments

  1. Why is the umbilical chord coming out of his ass?

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  2. what a fabulous depiction of the current situation through cartoon based on mythology.

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  3. well.. even I think of depicting humans of the age with mythological gems of hinduism.. but then I feel even if I compare negative shades of mythology with the villains of the date .. would insult the villains of mythology who had some ideologies to follow and the heroes can never be compared ..no matter how much we try..
    Selfish are both the leaders..and its better to select the less selfish given a choice .. :)
    Well depicted cartoon .. all i wish i could read one of our national languages and would have known the talent's name who made it !! :)

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    Replies
    1. Jack, the cartoonist is Raju Nair, fairly well known in Kerala.

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  4. haha...great! but recent progress has now reversed the rolls.

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  5. Wow nice and humorous... love ur post

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  6. Wow, an exact and superb comparison :)

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  7. yes true...they are not worthy of this comparision at all!!!!!!!

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  8. the cartoon is actually very deep. It has shown a great comparison. Thanks for sharing it here :)

    Richa

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  9. On the face of it yes, there seems like there is an analogy. But as you rightly pointed out, neither of them can be compared to characters Vyasa(or whoever) portrayed. Nevertheless, a more apt cartoon would have been a Hanuman (Modi) hiding behind his saviors Ram&Lakshman(RSS) who are shooting down Bali(Advani) who himself is a bhakth of the same gods who help Hanuman eliminate him.

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    Replies
    1. Even a cartoon is an aesthetic expression. This cartoonist had every right to think this way, I'm sure.

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  10. Hasn't anyone' religious sensibilities been offended yet? That would be a surprise!

    RE

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  11. An apt and humorous potrayal of the conflict of the top BJP leaders angling for the primeministerial berth!

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    Replies
    1. And Bhima will win the blessings of Hanuman and get his Sougandhika!

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  12. Hello, this is slightly off the topic here but I thought there is a need to get this in picture...Outlook survey on 'Most influential Indians 2013' and once you log in the most horrible thing I came across was for each state they have 5 nominations...delhi is ruled by Gandhi's it seems and Gujarat has no place for Modi...To me this looked like a really biased survey. And it's not fair on people who dont know these details. Once the results are out we all will get busy tweeting/ blogging/ writing without knowing fully on how it was conducted... Need you to look into this and share comment on this....

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  13. Hahha excellent - Raju Nair has surpassed Amul Poster Ads this time. Rules are the same, motive of winning is intact, be it war or politics.

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    Replies
    1. Thanks, Vyoma. It's nice to see your comments. Welcome to this space.

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  14. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  15. This is really a wonderful piece of creative writing. I really liked it.
    You can read similar things on our website too.
    Just visit us at https://edupediapublications.org/

    ReplyDelete

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